Message from David Alan Harvey

Video by Frank Overton Brown III 

 

Emerging Photographer Fund

 

EPF 2016 Recipient  is Annie Flanagan with her essay “Deafening Sound”

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award 2016 Recipient  is Aleksander Raczynski with his essay “Views”

 

Diana Zeyneb Alhindawi – Pride Uganda

Jackson Mukasa rests his head on the lap of his friend, Kim Mukisa, who has dropped by for a visit to Mukasa’s home in Kampala, Uganda. In January 2014, the two were beaten and arrested, accused of homosexuality. After 5 months in jail, their case was dismissed for lack of prosecution. After their release, they began life anew, having been robbed of their possessions. Mukisa, a clothing designer, also lost his atelier and shop in downtown Kampala. Uganda is known to be one of the worst countries in the world for LGBT human rights. Kampala, Uganda. August 14, 2015. © Diana Zeyneb Alhindawi 

Diana Zeyneb Alhindawi

Pride Uganda

Between August 5th and 9th, 2015, the LGBT community in Uganda held their fourth Pride celebration despite the country being one of the worst in the world for LGBT rights. Moreover, the turnout was larger than ever before. As with previous Pride celebrations, the events were held in “secret”: they were not advertised to the public, and took place in private locations disclosed to members of the LGBT community and their supporters only a few days before an event. The program included presentations on issues of concern to LGBTs, a Mister and Miss Pride competition, a Pride march, and various other performances and festivities.

 

 

Bio

Diana Zeyneb Alhindawi uses photography to explore the human condition across a variety of political and cultural contexts. She is based in Brooklyn, USA, but usually works in areas experiencing social unrest or humanitarian emergencies. Her photography has been published and showcased by various media outlets, including the New York Times, The Sunday Times Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, Le Monde and Vice Magazine, and by international NGOs like Doctors without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières, Human Rights Watch and International Committee of the Red Cross. In 2014, she was named one of Lens Culture’s Top 50 Emerging Talents for 2014. In 2015, she received the ICRC Humanitarian Visa d’Or Award for her coverage of the Minova Rape Trial, eastern Congo’s most significant mass rape trial to date.

Diana’s interests reflect her multicultural background and upbringing: born in rural Romania to a Romanian mother and Iraqi father, Diana witnessed her family experience political circumstances that landed them as refugees in the former Yugoslavia, after which they were resettled to Canada. These early experiences led her to pursue careers in humanitarian aid and in human rights. For several years, she managed programs for the United Nations, and international nonprofits like Save the Children USA and Oxfam Great Britain, working on the ground in areas affected by conflict or natural disasters. In mid-2013, she decided to focus her professional efforts entirely on photography.

 

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Diana Zeyneb Alhindawi

Stefano Schirato – Where Shall I Go?

Stefano Schirato

Where Shall I Go?

“I don’t think anyone will survive,” said Schiavone, repentant, in his secret testimony. “In Casal di Principe, Castel Volturno, and so on, the inhabitants are all at risk of dying from cancer within twenty years.” He was former treasurer of Casalesi clan controlling the territory in the so-called “Land of fires”: an area in Campania, situated among the province of Caserta and Naples, sadly known for being the most polluted area of this region, due to millions of toxic waste that have been illegally dumped here over the past 20 years. National and international industries have been illegally disposing hazardous waste thanks to deals with local politicians and the Camorra, cutting down the enormous costs of legal disposing. Waste is not only buried underground, in fields where agriculture and farming are present, but also incinerated. The environmental disaster is the greatest in Italy, affecting not only soil, and the related products of agriculture and breeding, but also the aquifer. The presence of leachate flowing underground; poisons filling up enormous caves; the air unbreathable due to miasmas and the smoke coming from pyres set on fire. Day by day, the lives of people living near the dumping sites are put at risk, especially among children and young people.

My work is actually made of two strands: on one hand, the story of a land, tormented by an underworld pollution, that’s sentencing the inhabitants to death. On the other hand, my purpose is to tell the story of its inhabitants: young children who died of cancer; inconsolable but courageous mothers, who unceasingly march and protest against this massacre; ill people, daily fighting to keep alive; teenagers who lost their parents and claim a better future. All these people united by the same destiny and by such a strong attachment to their origins that if you dare ask them why they don’t decide to move somewhere else, you might get an answer like “And where shall I go?”.

 

 

Bio

Stefano Schirato was born in Bologna in 1974, where he graduated in Political Sciences.
He has been working as a freelance photographer with a keen focus on social themes.
 After several reportages covering topics such as the condition of the street children living in the sewers of Bucharest, he was  awarded with a scholarship to take part in a course with Magnum photographer Paolo Pellegrin.
In 1999, together with the Non-Governmental Organization New Humanity and in support of Emergency, he proposed to witness the drama of landmines in Cambodia. This work gave birth to his first book, Gli occhi della Cambogia, with a preface by Ferdinando Scianna.
Starting from 2000 he devoted himself to a long-term project about seized ships which was to take him, over the next two years, in various mediterranean ports in order to document the life of maritime prisoners on board.
In 2002 he met the Oscar-winning film director Giuseppe Tornatore, who examined his images and encouraged their publication.
 The same year, the publisher Silvana Editoriale launched his new book entitled Né in terra, né in mare (neither on sea nor land) with an essay by G. Tornatore.
 In the last years has been divided between social issues and still photography and backstage of G. Tornatore’s movies. His works have appeared on Vanity Fair, Panorama, D La Repubblica delle Donne, Il Manifesto, International Herald Tribune, New York Times, Cnn, Le Figarò Magazine, Washington Post, Geo International. His last work on the Refugee Crisis along the Balkan Route “One Way Only” has been exposed in the Chamber of Deputies in Rome by the President Laura Boldrini.

 

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Stefano Schirato

14&15 Mobile Photographers – #1415IRAN

Photo by @ayda_rasulii

Photo by @ayda_rasulii

14&15 Mobile Photographers

#1415IRAN

A photographic book and a permanent observatory on today’s Iran, made by Iranian photographers. Using their smartphones, they tell the story of the daily life of a country caught between modernity and tradition; the richness of a collective memory in continuous growing Iran, which is one of those countries that we know very little about. It possesses incredible photographic talent that has found a way of expressing itself with smartphones and shares its vision with hundreds of thousands of people on Instagram. The audience is mostly young adults, college students, some of them are photographers or want to be, and others are involved in social issues. A lot of these people have organized themselves in photographic groups, worked on projects for Instagram that have later being exhibited on photographic gallery. We aim to show the face of a different Iran. Not the one shown by outside media experts, giving their own iconographic interpretation of the country. Not the one shown by a single photographer hand-picked by media as the professional “witness” to tell a story that does not belong to him, published in a magazine and cleverly packaged to meet its editorial policy. We aim to show Iran in the same way as seen by Iranians, through their photographic talent.

Inviting the large number of Iranian followers of our Instagram page, we launched the hashtag, #1415IRAN, for six months, and collected over 16,000 images from more than 300 Instagramers. This reflected an incredible visual richness and provided eyewitness accounts of life, tastes, habits, entertainment, traditions, healthcare, women, family life, modernity, country life, religion, and street life from the people of Iran.

Even after the deadline closed in August 2016, new images are still coming in every day. This is a sign of the productivity of Iranian mobile photographers and their desire to establish real, as well as virtual relationships with the outside world. They seek professional opportunities, as a way of belonging to a wider world.

The publication of a book involves a drastic selection of images, reducing the number of 16,000 to 80-100 photographs. A mass of precious material will be lost in the Instagram sea. Somehow this is a waste, dissipating richness and a knowledge available for everyone. For this reason, we want to open a permanent observatory, a website as an open window on the imagery produced daily in Iran. It will be the second step. At the moment we are concentrating only on the book, as it can be the first place to preserve part of this collection of images. It can also contribute to a better understanding of Iran and in doing so, eliminate a series of clichés.

To support the printing costs, we have recently launched a crowdfunding on Kisskissbankbank platform, to let people be more involved in project, as they can share the contents of #1415IRAN project and support the printing, buying one or more copy of the book in pre-sale.

 

 

Bio

14&15 Mobile Photographers is a web platform dedicated to the discovery and the promotion of photographic talents, through a series of activities such as book publishing, collective projects, exhibitions, prints sales and more; we focus on photographers using the new tool for producing their stories-features-pictures: the smartphone. The platform has been founded in 2015 by photographers Giorgio Cosulich de Pecine and Giulio Napolitano, with over twenty years of experience in international photo-journalism, working for clients such as United Nations, Getty Images, Agence France Presse, Nike, Qantas, Newsweek, Time, Stern, NY Times, Vanity Fair and many more.

 

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1415 Mobile Photographers

Diego Moreno – Guardians of Memory

Diego Moreno

Guardians of Memory

“His truth shall be thy shield and buckler… A thousand shall fall at thy side, and ten thousand at thy right hand; but it shall not come nigh thee. Ps. 91:4,7.”

This series originated with “Los Panzudos Mercedarios”, the stout guardians of the neighborhood of La Merced in San Cristóbal de las Casas in Chiapas, México. The Panzudos represent the sins: the more sins a person has to expiate, the bigger and uglier his attire will be, the better to cure his sins. These figures herald the feast day of Our Lady of La Merced and accompany her, purifying themselves in the process. The announcement is made as the figure of the Virgin Mary passes by, carried on the shoulders of her bearers, with a retinue of Aztecs, Catholics, and Moors mounted on horseback. They are dressed as Arabs and with their faces painted. This attire represents the Muslims who invaded and occupied Spain between 702 and 1492. Integrated this ancestral imaginary with the exploration of familiar universe. I try to investigate the links, the monstrosity, disease and death. I explore the tunnels of representation of domestic space. Fusing it with pre-Hispanic traditions and the apocalyptic visions of the Catholic religion. This work gives new meaning to the complex tangle of the concealed and the visible, the individual and the collective subconscious, on the highly complex map of coexisting cultures and beliefs in contemporary Mexico.

 

 

 

Bio

Diego Moreno was born in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, México in 1992. Since 2012 he has studied photography at the Art Gymnasium Chiapas. He won a scholarship for a Photo Narrative and New Media course at the Pedro Meyer Foundation awarded by the World Press Photo Association of 2014. Graduated of Contemporary Photography Seminar from Center for the Image in 2015. Selected by The British journal of photography as one of the emerging photographers to follow in the world as a talent issue 2016, in London England. Moreno has been creditor to the prize acquisition of the X Biennial 2015 Puebla de los Angeles in Mexico. Also in 2015 he has been granted with the scholarship “JOVENES CREADORES” by the National System of Creators in México FONCA/CONACULTA. He was finalist within Latin American Identity Cuartoscuro contest in 2016 and finalist within International Photography Award Emergentes dst 2016 in Braga, Portugal. Nominated for the Joop Swart Masterclass of World Press Photo in Amsterdam in 2016 and its Latin American Broadcast in Mexico in 2015. She has participated in group and Individual exhibitions in Mexico, Chile, Taiwan, Malaysia, Ámsterdam, London, Spain, E.U and Brazil.

 

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Diego Moreno

Swarat Ghosh – Beyond Street

Swarat Ghosh

Beyond Street

For me in the street I normally try to catch the emotions more than anything. For me “Content” is the King. As long as I am getting strong subjects with varied emotions which people can easily relate to, I think as a photographer I have done justice to myself. I just enjoy the whole experience of making pictures till date. For me, street photography is all about the timing and the capacity to observe. I pat myself on the back for the sheer dedication with which I push myself when making images on the streets. Many times I feel to skip on weekends (due to my software job) but somehow drag myself just for the sheer joy of clicking that magic picture at a time.

 

 

 

Bio

Swarat Ghosh is a Hyderabad based Street photographer . He is also part of a street photography collective called “That’s Life”. His work has been published in several national and international magazines including National Geographic Traveller and International Street Photographer. For him, photography is all about the timing and the capacity to observe. He loves taking photographs that are complex in composition and layered with multiple descriptive and conceptual elements, depicting stories from everyday life. His work is exhibited in London, Paris, Glasgow, Thailand, Mumbai & Hyderabad. Last year he won a Neel Dongre Awards for Excellence in Photography grant organised by India Photo Archive Foundation. The Neel Dongre grant was his first serious attempt at documentary photography.

 

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Swarat Ghosh

@swaratghosh

Lori Hawkins – Belief

Lori Hawkins

Belief

This series is a portrait of the Hasidic communities in Brooklyn. After decades of decline, the Jewish population of New York City is growing again, fueled by the explosive growth of the Orthodox Jewish. The neighborhoods of Borough Park, Williamsburg and Crown Heights are home to some of the largest Orthodox Jewish communities outside of Israel. The Hasidim began settling in Brooklyn in large numbers during and just after World War II and took refuge here. Within these communities, there seems to be an extreme sense of stopping time and resisting change; rebuilding and working hard to preserve the old ways.

 

 

Bio

Lori Hawkins is a freelance photographer based in New York City and has spent several years focusing on Asian issues including the aftermath of the South Asia Earthquake in Pakistan/India, Acid Throwing in Pakistan, and Poverty. Her recent work includes reportage on refugees and coverage of the election protests in Philadelphia, New York, and Washington, D.C. Lori’s work has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, South China Morning Post, Direct Soir, Focus Magazine and New York Magazine. Her photographs have been included in both solo and group exhibitions in New York City and around the U.S.

 

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Lori Hawkins

Chris Bickford – Legends of the Sandbar

Christopher Bickford

Legends of the Sandbar

Legends of the Sandbar is an homage to the surf culture of the Outer Banks of North Carolina, written and photographed by Christopher Bickford. It is an ode to the wild and wooly weather of the Banks, their shape-shifting sandscapes, their salt-battered architecture, and the commitment of a waterlogged band of misfits to a life lived on the fringes of American civilization. It is a portrait of a place, a people, and a passion, a drama set upon a wayward string of earth dangling on the edge of the continental shelf. It bears testimony to the raw beauty of lives lived close to the edge, the kinetic artistry of surfing in a challenging aquatic environment, and the ragged glory of a boondock community tuned to the savage power of the storm-tossed Atlantic Ocean.

The book version of Legends of the Sandbar, a culmination of 8 years of work, is available now for pre-sales. in addition to roughly 200 photographs, it includes 15 written pieces ranging from oral history to geology, meteorology, and memoir. The final version goes to print in Italy in March. Follow me on Instagram @chrisbickford to get an inside look at the printing process. Pre-orders are extremely helpful to offset printing costs. Advance buyers who order before March 1 will all be listed in the book as sponsors.

Purchase your copy here: www.legendsofthesandbar.com/shop

 

 

Bio

Christopher Bickford is is a photographer and writer currently based on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. His work has appeared in National Geographic Traveler, the New York Times, Outside Magazine, Time Magazine, Surfline, Milepost Magazine, Outer Banks Magazine. His work has been syndicated in publications worldwide, including Sawasdee (Thailand) The Bomb (South Africa), Photo (Brazil) and Vision (China). He is currently represented by the National Geographic Creative agency.

 

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Christopher Bickford

Mark Lubell interview

A Conversation with Mark Lubell

 

Niki Gleoudi – Shades Blue

Niki Gleoudi

Shades Blue

How would we describe our life today? In a world that moves rapidly, in a world that constantly changes, in a city like New York where time imposes fast response and gallops breathlessly, can people be alone? Do they have time to feel alone?

In this photoessay I am portraying mainly the loneliness, the impossible actual communication even when people are in physical proximity. I am trying to capture the fragmental substance and present contact through an intermediate reality which is “mirrored” as a reflection in the glass. Perhaps the only truth is the one happening online, illuminating with a blue light the everyday routine. Subtracting the city’s surroundings, the noise, the traffic, the commotion and sometimes even the ambience around the subjects photographed, the moment that these people are and feel alone is evident. The only time where there is contact between two people is a blurred kiss. Finally, communication is accomplished by a couple. They are not alone. They become one and the energy interflows from one to another.

 

 

Bio

Born and raised in Greece, Gleoudi studied at Washington University in St. Louis, USA.
While working in Greece she developed an interest in people and street photography. After moving to Miami, USA four years ago she started working on various projects, mostly documentary. Gleoudis took workshops with David Alan Harvey, Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris, Bruce Gilden, Costa Manos, Raul Touzon who also mentored her for a year while working on a project with native Americans. She have exhibited solo in ZM Gallery, Thessaloniki, Greece in 1998 and group exhibitions in St. Louis, Athens, Thessaloniki Greece and Cyprus as well.
Gleoudi is a member of BULB collective.

 

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Niki Gleoudi